Recreation Management - Ideas and Solutions for Recreation, Sports & Fitness Facility Managers

Feature Story

July 2015


2015's Best & Worst Cities for Recreation

Recent Rec Report Feature Stories

Study Shows Sport Can Ease Retirement Transition - June 2015

NWLC Reports on Athletics Gap for Female Minorities - June 2015

Minneapolis, St. Paul Top ParkScore Index - May 2015

YMCA, NSPF Cooperate on Operator Training - May 2015

National Water Safety Month Kicks Off May 1 - April 2015

IHRSA Releases Seasonal Report - April 2015

National Parks Maintenance Backlog Continues to Grow - March 2015

NACCHO Recommends Best Practices for Recreational Water Venues - March 2015

National Parks Break Records in 2014 - February 2015

Get Support for Recycling! - February 2015

Initiative Aims to Boost Youth Sports Involvement - January 2015

Poll: Voters Want Investment in Biking, Walking - January 2015

Report Shows Multiple Violations After Water Facility Inspections - December 2014

Red Cross Invites Aquatic Facilities to Promote Classes Online - November 2014

IHRSA Report Explores How Clubs Can Retain Members - November 2014

ACSM Survey Predicts 2015 Fitness Trends - October 2014

Parental Misconceptions About Concussions Could Hinder Treatment, Recovery - October 2014

Obesity Rates Remain High - September 2014

CDC Releases Model Aquatic Health Code - September 2014

Resource Helps Teach Bicycle Safety - August 2014

Our Great Parks Are Economic Engines - July 2014

National Park Service Grants to Support Outdoor Rec in Cities - July 2014

To celebrate National Park and Recreation Month in July, WalletHub conducted an in-depth analysis, ultimately naming 2015's best and worst cities for recreation.

In 2014, the most popular U.S. cities collectively spent more than $6.4 billion on parks and recreation, the organization said. "And those cities should expect a handsome return on that investment. Neighborhood parks are instrumental to building community cohesion, boosting property values, improving public health and reducing pollution."

Ultimately, the study compared the 100 largest U.S. cities across 27 key metrics, including basic costs, quality of parks, accessibility of entertainment and recreational facilities, as well as climate.

The 10 Best Cities for Recreation in 2015, according to WalletHub are:

  1. Cincinnati, Ohio
  2. Omaha, Neb.
  3. Scottsdale, Ariz.
  4. Tampa, Fla.
  5. Boise City, Idaho
  6. Orlando, Fla.
  7. Minneapolis
  8. St. Louis
  9. Reno, Nev.
  10. Denver

The 10 Worst Cities for Recreation are:

  1. Jersey City, N.J.
  2. Newark, N.J.
  3. Irving, Texas
  4. Laredo, Texas
  5. Hialeah, Fla.
  6. Chula Vista, Calif.
  7. North Las Vegas, Nev.
  8. Fremont, Calif.
  9. Garland, Texas
  10. Anaheim, Calif.

Some other fun findings from the study include:

  • Madison, Wis., has 14 times as many park playgrounds per 100,000 residents as Hialeah, Fla.
  • The percentage of the population with walkable park access is four times higher in San Francisco than in Charlotte, N.C.
  • Washington spends 100 times more on parks per capita than Hialeah, Fla.
  • Seattle has 46 times as many coffee shops per 100,000 residents as Laredo, Texas.
  • The number of bike rental facilities per 100,000 residents is 28 times higher in San Francisco than in Tulsa, Okla.

For the full report and a lot more detail, visit http://wallethub.com/edu/best-worst-cities-for-recreation/5144/.