Recreation Management - Ideas and Solutions for Recreation, Sports & Fitness Facility Managers

Feature Story

February 2019


Guide Aims to Help Gyms Implement Diabetes Prevention

Recent Rec Report Feature Stories

Senior Living Continues Shift Toward Wellness - February 2019

Partnership Aims to Expand Play Opportunities - January 2019

Grant Funds Help Educate Pool Operators - January 2019

NFL Foundation Grants Boost Local Football Fields - January 2019

Leaders Recognized for Advancing Outdoor Recreation - January 2019

Goldfish Swim School Sponsors USA Swimming Foundation - December 2018

Physical Activity for Kids Gets Low Grade - December 2018

New Law Helps Sports Medicine Professionals & Athletes - December 2018

Outdoor Recreation Adds Billions to U.S. Economy - November 2018

Nearly $1 Million in Pool Grants Awarded - November 2018

Report: One in Four Americans Use a Health Club - November 2018

New Active Transportation Program Aims to Boost Health & Environment - November 2018

Foundation Celebrates Sports Innovations - October 2018

Grant Awarded to Chattanooga Nature Play Area - October 2018

Obesity Continues to Challenge America's Health - October 2018

Grant Program Funds Keep America Beautiful Initiatives - October 2018

Nation's Pediatricians Emphasize Power of Play - October 2018

Step Into Swim Continues to Create New Swimmers - September 2018

Pickleball Benefits Older Adults - September 2018

NSPF Endorses MAHC Adoption - September 2018

Cities Spend More on Public Parks in 2018 - September 2018

Be Ready for Back-to-School Sports - August 2018

NRPA, Pool Safely Partner on Water & Recreation Safety - August 2018

States Make Progress Toward Active Transportation - August 2018

IHRSA Briefing Looks at Club Employees vs. Contractors - August 2018

ACSM & Wellcoaches Expand Offerings for Fitness Pros - July 2018

Grants Help Local Trail Projects - July 2018

Grant to Boost Meals & Nutrition for Kids - July 2018

Trust for Public Land Releases ParkServe Database - July 2018

CPSC Asks for Vigilance to Prevent Child Drowning - July 2018

TPL Earns NEA Grant to Explore Creative Placemaking - June 2018

High Visa Denial Rates Could Affect Pools - June 2018

Make a Splash Campaign Teaches Millions to Swim - June 2018

Communities Can Earn Grants for Dog Park Development - June 2018

National Golf Day Celebrates Green Practices - May 2018

YMCA Recognized for Diversity - May 2018

Americans Support Pollinator Health, And Parks Can Help - May 2018

How to Encourage Play—Everywhere! - April 2018

Partnership, Grants to Boost Mountain Bike Trail Development - April 2018

Parks & Recreation Supports More Than 1.1 Million Jobs - April 2018

Club Pilates Grows With New Training Facility - April 2018

IHRSA Sees Positive Growth for Fitness Pros - April 2018

Denver's Freedom Park Wins Grant for Public Art - March 2018

NSPF, Counsilman-Hunsaker Partner to Create App for Aquatic Facility Managers - March 2018

More Than 330 Million Recreation Visits Recorded in 2017 for National Park System - March 2018

Study Shows Economic Benefits of the Great Outdoors - March 2018

Parks for Inclusion Initiative Aims to Expand Reach to All Americans - February 2018

SHAPE America, NFL & Partners Collaborate on Training for Health & P.E. Educators - February 2018

CPSC Offers $1.1 Million in Pool Safely Grants - February 2018

Bipartisan PHIT Act Could Boost America's Wellness - February 2018

By Chandler Garland

The International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association (IHRSA) recently released the "How Your Club Can Leverage New Diabetes Prevention Program" briefing paper to help fitness centers understand and implement the CDC's Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Diabetes continues to be a growing problem in the United States and it ranked as the seventh leading cause of death in the United States for 2015. There were approximately 30 million diagnosed cases of the disease as of 2015. Another 84 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. And only 11.6 percent of Americans with prediabetes knew they had it.

People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications, including vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and amputation of toes, feet or legs. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that diagnosed diabetes costs $327 billion a year. One in seven healthcare dollars in the United States is spent treating diabetes and its complications.

However, type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through a healthy diet and regular exercise. This was confirmed by the results of the DPP, which began as a randomized study in 1996. For the study, the CDC randomly divided diagnosed diabetics into three groups that would undergo an intensive lifestyle change program, receive a medication, and one group that would receive neither—a control group. The trial ended early because the effects were compelling. Medication resulted in a 31 percent lower risk of developing diabetes, and the lifestyle change program resulted in a 58 percent lower risk. Older people fared even better: Those in the lifestyle change program who started after age 60 lowered their diabetes risk by 71 percent. Since then, researchers continued to follow most of the participants over the following 15 years and found the DPP Lifestyle Change program continued to be the most effective in preventing diabetes and was cost-effective after 10 years.

From this study the CDC launched a diabetes prevention program curriculum, Prevent T2, in 2016. As of 2018, Medicare, which was already reimbursing lifestyle change programs to prevent diabetes run by clinical centers, will reimburse non-clinical centers—like health clubs—that deliver CDC-recognized diabetes prevention programs. IHRSA's briefing paper is intended as a resource to help non-clinical centers best implement these programs for users. The paper includes:

  • Three ways to implement DPP
  • Checklist to build your program
  • Data security tips
  • Insight from a club implementing DPP

In the U.S., the fitness industry reaches about 18 percent of the population. When you consider that 60 percent of Americans have at least one chronic disease like diabetes, the need for more engagement with clubs is obvious. Offering medically oriented programs can be a strategy to reach more people and provide added value to current members. However, clubs that enter the medical space often struggle with establishing the credibility of their programs with health professionals. DPP programing along with the IHRSA's resource hope to address these issues to provide enriching programs proven to lower diabetes.