Web Exclusive - October 2020
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Better Lighting, Less Maintenance

Fant-Ewing Coliseum at University of Louisiana Monroe


When the University of Louisiana Monroe needed a new lighting solution for its Fant-Ewing Coliseum it had two crucial criteria: better lighting, and lower maintenance costs.

The facility's traditional metal halide fixtures were not efficient, and due to their height and location, changing the burnt-out bulbs and ballasts was a challenging maintenance task. In addition, fixtures were averaging around 30 footcandles, and with inconsistent light levels across the playing surface, because the lamps and ballasts were all depreciating at different rates.

Ultimately, the university chose AEON LED Luminaires for the coliseum. A photometric study helped engineer even illumination across the court, and now the Fant-Ewing Coliseum is averaging close to 100 footcandles, with no dark spots or uneven lighting. In addition, the luminaires are designed to provide glare-free illumination, eliminating visual discomfort for players, spectators and the broadcast.

The Warhawks' lighting retrofit has significantly reduced energy and maintenance costs, while providing high-quality illumination, with high-color rendition—ready for national broadcasts.

When it came time for installation, "I didn't really know what to expect," said Keith Richard ULM Men's Head Basketball Coach. "Once completed and the lights were turned on, I was shocked at how bright and impressive the inside now looked. Our pictures taken have improved dramatically, broadcasting of TV games will be so much better, and I haven't had one player complain about the lighting like they used to."

The long lifespan of the luminaires—more than 100,000 hours—will help significantly reduce the expenditures associated with traditional lighting.

With an LED solution that will provide high-quality, long-lasting light levels while eliminating maintenance, the University of Louisiana Monroe will save time and money, freeing resources for projects other than replacing failed lamps and ballasts.



FOR MORE INFORMATION
University of Louisiana Monroe: www.ulm.edu